FAQ

Wood Stoves and Fireplaces

Yes, you can install a wood fireplace in a mobile home. However, the fireplace you install must have been specifically approved for mobile home applications (Canada & USA).

The fireplace must also be hooked-up to a fresh air intake that enables combustion air to come from outside the house. Osburn freestanding stoves model 1000, 1100, 1600, 1800, 2200, and 2400 are approved for installation in a mobile home. You need to purchase a fresh air kit, which can be found in the accessories section.

It is possible to install a fireplace using your existing masonry chimney. The chimney must comply with the building code of your country, state or province. It usually needs to be lined with refractory bricks, metal, or clay tiles sealed together with fire cement.

The diameter of the chimney must be the same as the fireplace’s flue outlet. If your masonry chimney does not have the same diameter as the fireplace’s flue outlet, you need to insert a stainless steel liner having the proper diameter. Otherwise, you may face draft problems.

There are many types of synthetic (manufactured) logs on the market. You need to carefully read the instructions on the packaging. Those instructions should clearly mention whether the logs are approved for use in a fireplace (freestanding stove, zero clearance fireplace, or fireplace insert).

If there is no restriction mentioned on the packaging, try to contact the log manufacturer. Some types of synthetic logs are forbidden for use in freestanding stoves. Other logs may appear like synthetic logs, but they are completely natural (100% wood, without any additive). Those logs can generally be used in any type of fireplace, unless otherwise specified.

PLEASE NOTE: 100% natural manufactured logs can heat a lot more than regular logs. Never insert a large quantity in your fireplace. You risk overheating the fireplace.

A chimney thermometer is highly recommended. It can prevent problems by providing you with an instant indication whether you are over-firing or under-firing your fireplace. The chimney thermometer will prove very useful especially if you have just bought your fireplace.

You will know how to adjust the air intake control in order to operate your fireplace properly. Other members of your family will be able to rely on the thermometer in order to use the fireplace safely.

NOTE: double wall-fireplace pipes require a thermometer with a probe.

Yes. A floor protection is required for any wood fireplace, unless it already sits on a non-combustible surface. You need to consult your owner’s manual in order to know the dimensions of the floor protection specific to your model.

You have many choices:

  • stone
  • brick
  • tile
  • etc.

An ash drawer is a very practical feature, but it is not absolutely necessary. The ash drawer enables you to empty your fireplace and leave the ashes in the drawer until it is full. It makes cleaning more convenient and less messy.

If you do not have an ash drawer, you can scoop out the ashes into a small bucket (with a cover) that you leave near the fireplace. ALWAYS MAKE SURE THAT THE EMBERS ARE COLD BEFORE DISPOSING OF THEM.

Before answering this question, it is very important that you clearly identify what your needs are. Some people will buy a fireplace simply to enhance the ambiance of a room, while others will by a fireplace as their main source of heat. There is no good or bad reason for buying a wood fireplace. If you simply want to enhance the ambiance of a room, most small to medium fireplaces will suit your needs. Simply chose the style you like best, and put the fireplace in the room where you spend the most time. The heat and look of a glowing fire will create an atmosphere of warmth and well-being.

If your primary need is heat, you must verify the heating capacity of your fireplace based on the technical data provided by the manufacturer. For instance, if you want to heat an 800f2 (75m2)area, you need to buy a fireplace with a minimum capacity of 800f2 (75m2).

If you need to heat more that one floor, keep in mind that heat rises. Therefore, a fireplace located in your basement will help you heat the main floor as well. However, the contrary is not true; a fireplace located on the main floor (ground floor) will not heat the basement. Keep in mind also that the more divisions there are in the house, the harder it will be to distribute the heat evenly.

If you need to heat two floors, calculate the surface of the lower floor. Then, add 50% of the surface of the upper floor. For instance, if you install a fireplace in the basement and you have 800f2 ( 75m2), you will need a fireplace with a minimum capacity of 1,200f2 (800 + 400 = 1,200) or approximately 130m2.

If you need to heat more than two floors, calculate the surface of the lower floor (where the fireplace is located). Then, add 50% of the surface of the middle floor, and 25% of the surface of the upper floor. For instance, if your install a fireplace in the basement and you have 800f2 per floor, you will need a fireplace with a minimum capacity of 1,400f2 (800+400+200= 1,400). Consult drawing #1A. It will help you understand the explanations provided in this section.

WARNING: Wood fireplaces are designed for «zone» heating, not central heating. The room where the fireplace is located and the rooms directly above the fireplace will always reach higher temperatures than the rooms distant from the fireplace. If you want an even temperature throughout the house, you need to consider a central heating system, such as a wood furnace. Furthermore, you must keep in mind that the size of the fireplace you need may vary based in the insulation of your house, its exposition to wind, and the number of windows. It will always be prudent to buy a fireplace with a capacity that is slightly higher than the minimum capacity that you need. For instance, if you need a minimum capacity of 1,400f2 (130m2), it will be more prudent to buy a fireplace with a capacity of 1,500 to 1,600f2 (140 to 150 m2).

In the case of EPA certified fireplaces, there are generally two air intakes on the fireplace: primary and secondary. The exhaust gases are mixed with secondary air, causing them to re-ignite and burn before going up the chimney. The result is a reduction in particulate emissions, as well as an increased burn time. Some EPA certified fireplaces also work with a catalytic converter.

Instead of using secondary air, the smoke is channelled through a device that lowers the combustion temperatures of the gases. This allows gases to be consumed at lower firing. Catalytic converters need to be replaced after a certain number of operations and can be costly. Non-EPA wood fireplaces usually have only one air intake and have no catalytic converters.

All Osburn fireplaces are certified as per the latest CSA standards. Most of our fireplaces are tested by Warnock Hersey, an independent testing agency which role is to certify that our units comply with the security standards set by the CSA (Canadian Standard Association). This is why the certification plate at the back of our fireplaces reads «Warnock Hersey ». ULC (Underwriters Laboratories of Canada) is another independent testing agency.

All of our fireplaces also meet the American security standards, most of which are set by UL (Underwriters Laboratories). Most of our fireplaces are tested by Warnock Hersey.

For Australia and New-Zealand, our fireplaces have been tested by the Australian Home Heating Association (AHHA) as per the latest standards applicable to both countries.

Those three letters stand for « Environmental Protection Agency ». The Environmental Protection Agency is an American organization that elaborates and coordinates the application of laws which goal is to protect the environment.

EPA certified wood fireplaces meet emissions guidelines set by the Environmental Protection Agency. EPA certified wood fireplaces will generally release less particulates into the atmosphere and will provide a longer burn time.

There exist many specialized products on the market. The majority works very well. Your Osburn dealer probably carries a full range of cleaning products. Note that there is no miracle product. If your glass has not been cleaned periodically, creosote build-ups and combustion residues will be very hard to remove.

Your glass will probably not retrieve its original appearance. Replacing the glass is always an option, but it will be more costly. No matter what product you use, make sure you always clean the glass very well with a cloth. Otherwise, a white deposit may appear on the glass when you light up the fireplace.

Your exhaust system is comprised of two main elements: a chimney and a connector (commonly called «stove pipe»). There are two types of chimneys: a Class A metal chimney or a masonry chimney (Those terms are use in Canada and the USA. Terminology may differ in other countries).

Class A chimneys are rated to withstand temperatures up to 2100oF and are easy to install. The connector is made of steel and needs a minimum thickness of 24ga. You can also use a double wall connector that will enable you, in most cases, to reduce clearances to combustible material. The connector cannot go through ceilings, closets, floors, or any other combustible partition, because it is not insulated. It is the chimney that goes through combustible partitions and that goes out to the exterior of the house, according to the chimney manufacturer’s specifications.

The gasket is there to insure that your fireplace remains air tight, thus providing you with the maximum burn time and reducing the risk of overheating. How frequently you replace the gasket really depends on how often you use your fireplace. Most Osburn fireplaces have an adjustable handle that enables you to increase the useful life of your gasket by tightening the door when it becomes loose.

However, when you can no longer adjust the door, when the gasket becomes really hard, and when you notice a gap between the door and the fireplace, it is time to replace the gasket. If you use your fireplace on a regular basis during all winter, you may need to replace the gasket before every heating season.

We strongly suggest that you use the genuine gasket supplied by the manufacturer. The genuine gasket has a better density and comes with a special adhesive. It will last much longer. Avoid liquid glue and low-density gasket, with large and flabby knits. To obtain the genuine gasket replacement kit for your fireplace, please consult our accessories section.

The firebricks in your fireplace are there to protect the steel from the excessive heat of the flames and embers. Without firebricks, your fireplace would wear out prematurely. It could also become to hot and cause objects or structures nearby to catch fire. If you notice that some firebricks are disintegrated and the steel is directly in contact with the fire or embers, replace the firebricks immediately. If you only notice cracks on some firebricks, it is not necessary to replace them. The frequency at which you will change your firebricks depends on how often you use your fireplace.

There are different sizes of firebricks. Most stores will sell firebricks with a dimension of 4,5″ X9?X 1,25″. Those firebricks are adequate for many fireplaces, but will not fit on all Osburn units. It is preferable that you visit our parts section in order to clearly identify the type of firebrick that you need. Some models, like the Osburn 1600, have some larger, non-standard firebricks that are only available on special order.

Possible causes and solutions: 

1- The air control mechanism is completely open.

Solution: Gradually close the air control mechanism in order to keep the flue temperature within the comfort zone, between 250 and 475oF (150 to 250oC). If you do not have a chimney thermometer and would like to get one, visit your local Osburn dealer.

2- The door or glass gaskets are worn out and let too much air into the fireplace.

Solution: Replace the gasket using a genuine OSBURN adhesive and gasket kit. Please consult our accessories sections.

3- You are putting too much wood into the fireplace.

Solution: Put less wood into the fireplace. The fireplace will not produce as much heat and will not heat as long.

Possible causes and solutions: 

1- The wood used is too humid.

Solution: Make sure you use good, seasoned wood. The wood you burn plays an important role in the overall performance of your fireplace. Your wood should have been properly dried for approximately one year. Another key is storage. Wood that has been cut for one, two or even more years, will not necessarily be dry if it has been stored in poor conditions. Under extreme conditions, it may have rotten instead of drying. Smaller pieces of wood will dry faster. The wood should be stored in a place where the grass is not too long, and where the wind will be able to circulate between the logs. A 24′ to 48′ (approx. 60 to 120 cm) gap should be kept between the cords. The wood should be placed in the sunniest area and should be protected from the rain and the snow on top, but not the sides.

2- The air control mechanism is not open enough.

Solution: Adjust the air control mechanism in order to keep the flue temperature within the comfort zone (between 250 and 475oF) on your chimney thermometer (approx. 125 to 250oC). The air control mechanism must always be closed gradually. You need to obtain a good bed of red embers and the logs must be completely lit up before you close the air control completely. This can easily take up to one hour. If you do not have a chimney thermometer, visit your local Osburn dealer.

3- The logs that you are using are too big.

Solution: Use smaller pieces of wood and place them to allow proper air circulation between the logs. The same weight of wood cut in many small pieces will produce more heat than fewer, larger logs. Only add big logs when you have a good bed of red embers. Logs with a diameter exceeding 6 inches (153 mm) should always be split. Avoid stacking logs to the top of the fireplace.

4- The chimney draft is too weak.

Solution #1: In many cases, a weak draft is simply due to insufficient heat in the exhaust system. Build a small, intense fire, and leave the door ajar (never leave the fireplace unattended). Before inserting larger logs, use dry kindling to obtain a good bed of red embers. Gradually increase the size of the logs. Close the fireplace door when you reach a flue temperature of approximately 475oF (250oC) on the chimney thermometer. Leave the air intake fully open for approximately 15 minutes. Then, gradually close the air intake control. Note that there is no danger in letting the temperature inside the flue reach approximately 700oF (approx. 375oC) during start-up. This is even favourable in order to properly start your fireplace. You must however avoid maintaining excessive temperatures (above the comfort zone on your thermometer) during a long period of time. Your chimney thermometer should be positioned on the exhaust pipe, approximately 18 inches (45 cm) above the fireplace. If you do not have a chimney thermometer and would like to get one, visit your Osburn dealer.

Solution #2: Your fireplace may not have all the oxygen it needs to allow for a sufficient draft. You first need to insure that the room where the fireplace is located is sufficiently large and well ventilated. Open the nearest window by approximately 2 inches. If you notice a significant improvement, it is a sign that the fireplace needs more oxygen. The room may be too insulated or too small. Without an additional source of oxygen, the draft will remain weak and cause the fire to go out.

Solution #3: The chimney may be too short. In order to obtain a sufficient draft, your chimney must have a minimum height. A minimum height of 12 feet (3.66m), from the fireplace to the end of the chimney, will generally provide a sufficient draft. PLEASE NOTE: Longer is not always better. A chimney that is excessively long may be difficult to warm-up and control.

Solution #4: Your exhaust system may be too tortuous or may lack a sufficiently steep slope. Ideally, your exhaust system should not have more than one 90o elbow. Furthermore, all horizontal sections should be as short as possible and have a minimum slope of ¼’ (6.4 mm)per foot.

Solution #5: Your exhaust system may be oversized. When your chimney is oversized, the volume of air that needs to be warmed-up is larger. It is therefore difficult to reach temperatures that will allow for a sufficient draft. Most EPA certified fireplaces have a 6′ flue outlet (153 mm). If your exhaust system does not have a 6′ diameter, you can insert a stainless liner with a 6′ diameter inside the exhaust system.

Possible causes and solutions: 

1- The wood used is too humid.

Solution: Make sure you use good, seasoned wood. The wood you burn plays an important role in the overall performance of your fireplace. Your wood should have been properly dried for approximately one year. Another key is storage. Wood that has been cut for one, two or even more years, will not necessarily be dry if it has been stored in poor conditions. Under extreme conditions, it may have rotten instead of drying. Smaller pieces of wood will dry faster. The wood should be stored in a place where the grass is not too long, and where the wind will be able to circulate between the logs. A 24′ to 48′ (60 to 120 cm) gap should be kept between the cords. The wood should be placed in the sunniest area and should be protected from the rain and the snow on top, but not the sides.

2- The logs are positioned too close to the glass and are obstructing the airflow that is necessary to keep the glass clean.

Solution: Make sure to keep a minimum gap of 4′ (10 cm) between the logs and the glass.

3- The chimney draft is too weak.

Solution #1: In many cases, a weak draft is simply due to insufficient heat in the exhaust system. Build a small, intense fire, and leave the door ajar (never leave the fireplace unattended). Before inserting larger logs, use dry kindling to obtain a good bed of red embers. Gradually increase the size of the logs. Close the fireplace door when you reach a flue temperature of approximately 475oF (approx. 250oC) on the chimney thermometer. Leave the air intake fully open for approximately 15 minutes. Then, gradually close the air intake control. Note that there is no danger in letting the temperature inside the flue reach approximately 700oF (approx. 375oC ) during start-up. This is even favourable in order to properly start your fireplace. You must however avoid maintaining excessive temperatures (above the comfort zone on your thermometer) during a long period of time. Your chimney thermometer should be positioned on the exhaust pipe, approximately 18 inches (45 cm) above the fireplace. If you do not have a chimney thermometer, visit your local dealer.

Solution #2: Your fireplace may not have all the oxygen it needs to allow for a sufficient draft. You first need to insure that the room where the fireplace is located is sufficiently large and well ventilated. Open the nearest window by approximately 2 inches (5 cm). If you notice a significant improvement, it is a sign that the fireplace needs more oxygen. The room may be too insulated or too small. Without an additional source of oxygen, the draft will remain weak and cause the glass stay dirty.

Solution #3: The chimney may be too short. In order to obtain a sufficient draft, your chimney must have a minimum height. A minimum height of 12 feet (3.66 m), from the fireplace to the end of the chimney, will generally provide a sufficient draft. PLEASE NOTE: Longer is not always better. A chimney that is excessively long may be difficult to warm-up and control.

Solution #4: Your exhaust system may be too tortuous or may lack a sufficiently steep slope. Ideally, your exhaust system should not have more than one 90o elbow. Furthermore, all horizontal sections should be as short as possible and have a minimum slope of ¼’ (6.4 mm) per foot.

Solution #5: Your exhaust system may be oversized. When your chimney is oversized, the volume of air that needs to be warmed-up is larger. It is therefore difficult to reach temperatures that will allow for a sufficient draft. Most EPA certified fireplaces have a 6′ flue outlet (153 mm). If your exhaust system does not have a 6′ diameter, you can insert a stainless liner with a 6′ diameter inside the exhaust system.

1- The logs that you are using are too big.

Solution: Use smaller pieces of wood and place them to allow proper air circulation between the logs. The same weight of wood cut in many small pieces will produce more heat than fewer, larger logs. Only add big logs when you have a good bed of red embers. Logs with a diameter exceeding 6 inches (153 mm) should always be split. Avoid stacking logs to the top of the fireplace.

2- The chimney draft is too weak.

Solution #1: In many cases, a weak draft is simply due to insufficient heat in the exhaust system. Build a small, intense fire, and leave the door ajar (never leave the fireplace unattended). Before inserting larger logs, use dry kindling to obtain a good bed of red embers. Gradually increase the size of the logs. Close the fireplace door when you reach a flue temperature of approximately 475oF (250oC) on the chimney thermometer. Leave the air intake open for approximately 15 minutes. Then, gradually close the air intake control. Note that there is no danger in letting the temperature inside the flue reach approximately 700oF (375oC) during start-up. This is even favourable in order to properly start your fireplace. You must however avoid maintaining excessive temperatures (above the comfort zone on your thermometer) during a long period of time. Your chimney thermometer should be positioned on the exhaust pipe, approximately 18 inches (45 cm) above the fireplace. If you do not have a chimney thermometer and would like to get one, visit your Osburn dealer.

Solution #2: Your fireplace may not have all the oxygen it needs to allow for a sufficient draft. You first need to insure that the room where the fireplace is located is sufficiently large and well ventilated. Open the nearest window by approximately 2 inches (5 cm). If you notice a significant improvement, it is a sign that the fireplace needs more oxygen. The room may be too insulated or too small. Without an additional source of oxygen, the draft will remain weak.

Solution #3: The chimney may be too short. In order to obtain a sufficient draft, your chimney must have a minimum height. A minimum height of 12 feet (3.66m), from the fireplace to the end of the chimney, will generally provide a sufficient draft. PLEASE NOTE: Longer is not always better. A chimney that is excessively long may be difficult to warm-up and control.

Solution #4: Your exhaust system may be too tortuous or may lack a sufficiently steep slope. Ideally, your exhaust system should not have more than one 90o elbow. Furthermore, all horizontal sections should be as short as possible and have a minimum slope of ¼’ (6.4 mm) per foot.

Solution #5: Your exhaust system may be oversized. When your chimney is oversized, the volume of air that needs to be warmed-up is larger. It is therefore difficult to reach temperatures that will allow for a sufficient draft. Most EPA certified fireplaces have a 6′ flue outlet (153 mm). If your exhaust system does not have a 6′ diameter, you can insert a stainless liner with a 6′ diameter inside the exhaust system.

3- If you have verified points 1 through 4 and your fireplace works fine, but still does not heat enough, you may be asking your fireplace more than what it can realistically give you. Fireplaces are used for ‘zone’ heating. It is normal that the heat be distributed unevenly inside your home. It will always be colder in the rooms that are distant from the fireplace. Furthermore, since heat rises, a fireplace located at the ground floor level will not heat your basement.

Solution: It is possible to increase heat circulation between the floors by installing floor traps. The location of your fireplace is also important. Try to install it in a central location. If you want to heat both your basement and the ground floor, install your fireplace in the basement. The heat will rise to the upper floors. Verify that the area you try to heat is within the capacity of your fireplace. The heating capacity of your fireplace is indicated on the printed literature supplied by Osburn, or in the technical data section on our web side. Keep in mind that your fireplace’s heating capacity is calculated under the assumption that the house is in normal conditions. The actual heating capacity of a fireplace may be too low in situations where a house is poorly insulated, or highly exposed to wind. If you already have a fireplace with a high heating capacity (such as an Osburn 2400 freestanding stove) that works normally but does not heat enough, you probably need a central heating system, such as a wood furnace.

REMEMBER: Bigger is not always better. A large fireplace located in small, airtight room, may not have enough oxygen to operate normally. The advice in this section is provided under the assumption that the fireplace is located in an open, well-ventilated area.

Possible causes and solutions: 

1- Your wood is of poor quality or too humid.

Solution: Make sure you use good, seasoned wood. The wood you burn plays an important role in the overall performance of your fireplace. Your wood should have been properly dried for about one year. Furthermore, it is better to use hardwood, such as oak, maple, beech or ash. Hardwood will burn hotter and cleaner. Softwood (such as spruce and pine), on the other hand, will produce less heat for the same volume and will have a lot of sap, which increases the risk of creosote build-up in your chimney. Another key is storage. Wood that has been cut for one, two or even more years, will not necessarily be dry if it has been stored in poor conditions. Under extreme conditions, it may have rotten instead of drying. Smaller pieces of wood will dry faster. The wood should be stored in a place where the grass is not too long, and where the wind will be able to circulate between the logs. A 24′ to 48′ (approx. 60 to 120 cm) gap should be kept between the cords. The wood should be placed in the sunniest area and should be protected from the rain and the snow on top, but not the sides.

2- The air control mechanism is not open enough.

Solution: Adjust the air control mechanism in order to keep the flue temperature within the comfort zone, between 250 and 475oF (125 to 250oC), on your chimney thermometer. The air control mechanism must always be closed gradually. You need to obtain a good bed of red embers and the logs must be completely lit up before you can close the air control completely. This can easily take up to one hour. If you do not have a chimney thermometer and would like to get one, visit your local Osburn dealer.

It is important to note that because of the high temperatures reached on the surface of a fireplace, almost any type of high temperature paint will tend to discolour over time. However, if your fireplace has completely turned white in some areas shortly after it has been purchased, this is a sign that the fireplace has overheated. Many things can cause a fireplace to overheat.

Here is a brief list:

  1. The air intake control has been left fully open and flue temperatures have reached excessive levels for a long period of time;
  2. The chimney draft is excessive;
  3. The door was left ajar for a long period with a fire going;
  4. The door gasket is worn out;
  5. Firebricks have been damaged or disintegrated and have not been replaced;
  6. Pressure treated wood or other bi-products of wood were used as fuel;
  7. Manufactured logs were used in the fireplace.

It is important to identify why the fireplace has overheated. Otherwise, your fireplace may wear out prematurely. Make sure you use a chimney thermometer and keep flue temperatures within the comfort zone of 250 to 475oF (125 to 250oC).

You can paint your fireplace and make it look brand new. If the paint has not peeled off, you need to prepare the surface with a 180 grade sand paper. Then, repaint the fireplace with the original high temperature aerosol paint. If the paint has peeled off, you need to prepare the surface with a 180 grad sand paper and remove all the paint until you reach the steel. You can find the original high temperature paint for your fireplace by consulting our accessories section.

Possible causes and solutions: 

1- Your fireplace is new and thin smoke is coming out of the surface of the unit.

Solution: This is normal when your fireplace is new and has never been used. The paint needs to be ‘cured’. You need to heat your fireplace two or three of times before the curing process is completed. Simply open a window in the room where the fireplace is located. The amount of smoke produced by the curing process should be very limited.

2- The chimney in under negative pressure. (Consult the drawings under the question ‘What do the words draft and negative pressure mean’?)

Solution #1: The chimney may simply be too cold. Light up a small quantity of newspaper in the fireplace, as close as possible to the flue outlet. Leave the door slightly ajar. This small fire will slowly heat-up the chimney, until it is hot enough to create a normal draft inside the exhaust system. If needed, slowly increase the quantity of newspaper. When you realize that smoke is being evacuated normally through the exhaust system, you can build a normal fire. If you have a Class A insulated chimney that climbs along the outside wall of your house, it is possible to cover it up in order to protect it from the wind and the cold. A covered chimney will heat-up faster.

Solution #2: Air-moving devices, such as a range hood, a bathroom fan, or an air exchanger, may cause negative pressure. Check if smoking problems occur when those devices are working. If it is the case, make sure you turn them off when you use your fireplace. Otherwise, you need to make sure that the air leaving the room is replaced by air from outside the house. For instance, you can open a window slightly, by one or two inches (3 to 5 cm). Ideally, the source of fresh air should be located as close as possible to the fireplace.

Solution #3: Negative pressure may be caused by wind, due to the interference from a nearby structure. In order to eliminate such interference, the extremity of your chimney should be at least two feet higher than any structure (such as a big tree or a building) located within ten feet of your chimney. Furthermore, you must make sure that the extremity of your chimney is at least two feet higher than the highest point on your roof. Otherwise, the roof of your house itself may cause an interference with your chimney.

A blower can be installed at the back of your OSBURN fireplace. The blower is necessary if you wish to redistribute the heat trapped at the back of your fireplace. By forcing hot air toward the front, the blower enables you to extend the radiation power of your fireplace. If you do not have a blower and would like to get one, please consult our accessories section.

Please note that all the Osburn inserts have a blower.

Gas Stoves and Fireplaces

No. Gas fireplaces are designed to burn gas only. Burning wood would damage the fireplace and could be very dangerous.

All Osburn direct vent gas fireplaces are approved for installation in mobile homes, since they are airtight and draw their combustion air from outside the house.

No. This is the advantage of direct vent gas fireplaces. All you need is the proximity to an outside wall. Not only does this make the installation more flexible, but it also keeps the cost down.

If you still wish to vent your fireplace through the ceiling and up on the roof, it can be done easily with most models, either with a B-Vent or direct vent installation.

Certain restrictions apply with regards to where you can position the termination cap on the outside wall. You must carefully consult the instructions in your owner’s manual.

Gas fireplaces do not need a specific floor protection. You can install your fireplace directly on a wood floor, a carpet, or any other flooring material generally used in houses. Carpets made of long fabric are not recommended.

Yes. All Osburn gas fireplaces (fireplace inserts and freestanding stoves) use a «millivolt» generator. No electrical power is needed. The only accessory that relies upon electricity to function is the blower.

The wall thermostat and the remote control operate independently from any outside electrical current and therefore would not be affected by a power failure.

All Osburn gas fireplaces are very user friendly. Each fireplace is equipped with an easy-to-access control knob that enables you to turn the fireplace on and off. You simply have to push a button to turn the fireplace on.

Likewise, you turn the fireplace off by setting the control knob at «OFF». You can adjust the intensity of the fireplace from low to high with the control knob.

A remote control can be installed, which allows you to operate your Osburn gas fireplace from the comfort of your couch. A wall thermostat is also available on option. The wall thermostat will turn the fireplace on and off to keep the room temperature constant, according to the setting you have chosen.

The consumption and cost of operation may vary depending on the region, the gas utility company, or the type of fuel. Following is an example of how to calculate the approximate cost of operating a 25,000 BTU fireplace at the maximum flow rate.

Natural gas:
One cubic meter (1m3) of natural gas produces an average of 35,301 BTU. At the maximum flow rate, a 25,000 BTU fireplace will consume 0,708m3* of natural gas per hour (i.e. 25,000/35,301). If natural gas is priced at 0,365$* per cubic meter, it would cost 0,26$* per hour to operate the fireplace at its highest setting. The same calculation applies for the minimum flow rate.

Propane (LP):
One litre of propane produces an average of 29,059 BTU. At the maximum flow rate, a 25,000 BTU fireplace will consume 0,86 litre of propane per hour (i.e. 25,000/29,059). If propane is priced at 0,45$* per litre, it would cost 0,39$* per hour to operate the fireplace at its highest setting. The same calculation applies for the minimum flow rate.

*Costing and consumption are approximate values and may vary depending on the region, the gas utility company, and the way in which one operates a fireplace.

Yes, it is possible to convert your fireplace in order to use a different type of gas. You need to purchase a conversion kit that fits your model of fireplace.

To get the part number of the proper conversion kit, consult our accessories section. You must have a certified technician to perform the conversion.

Yes, provided that your fireplace is equipped with a «millivolt» gas valve model S.I.T. Nova 820, Honeywell # VS8420E8001, or Robertshaw Millivolt.

Consult the owner’s manual to find out what type of valve is on your fireplace. Osburn’s model Romance has a millivolt thermostatic valve. To verify the possibility of adding a wall thermostat or a remote control, you can remove the valve’s cover and look for the «TP», «TH», and «TP-TH» ports located on the valve.

If you can locate those connectors, your fireplace can receive the wall thermostat or remote control options.

The standard energy measurement is the BTU (British Thermal Unit).

Each BTU unit is determined by the amount of thermal energy required to raise the temperature of one pound of water by one degree Fahrenheit. To specify the BTU power of an appliance, we need to calculate its fuel consumption per hour, multiplied by the fuel’s BTU value.

There are three different terms that represent three different ways of ‘venting’ a gas fireplace, that is, to supply combustion air to the fireplace and evacuate combustion gases out of the house.

B-VENT: 
In Australia, the term ‘open flue’ is commonly used instead of ‘B-vent’. B-vent means a traditional type ‘B’, 4′ (102mm) rigid pipe used to evacuate combustion gases. It can also be a certified flexible aluminium liner of the same diameter, inserted into an existing masonry chimney or a prefab chimney. A ‘B-vent’ (or open flue) gas fireplace draws air from inside the house through ports located on the firebox. Usually, a fresh air source is provided as close as possible to the fireplace to insure a constant supply of oxygen in the room, which is necessary to achieve a good combustion and an adequate draft. A fresh air source will also prevent negative pressure problems that can be caused by air moving equipment, such as a heat exchanger, a bathroom fan, or a range hood.

DIRECT VENT: 
In Australian the term ‘balanced flue’ or ‘room sealed appliance’ is commonly used. This is a sealed installation. Direct vent pipes have a double wall. The main pipe draws air from outside the house to the firebox while the centre pipe expels the combustion gases and moisture outside. (See picture below). It requires no chimney and it is an independent, sealed and safe evacuation system.

VENT-FREE:
«Vent-free» fireplaces use the room’s oxygen for combustion and expel combustion gases (H2O, CO2, CO, NO2, O2) inside the house. These types of fireplaces require no chimney. However, their use is illegal in Canada and in the following states: Alaska, Massachusetts, Montana, Minnesota, Colorado, Utah, and California. Wisconsin restricts installation in homes built after 1980.

Direct vent gas fireplaces:
Direct vent gas fireplaces are safety tested with a specific brand of pipe. Therefore, it is not possible to install a direct vent gas fireplace with any type of exhaust system. The brand (manufacturer) of the pipe chosen must have been specifically approved for your Osburn gas fireplace. For instance, Osburn model «Romance» is approved with the following brands of pipe:

  • Secure Vent (manufactured by Security Chimney International)
  • Simpson Dura Vent
  • SBI (manufactured by Flexmaster)

B-Vent gas fireplaces:
B-Vent gas fireplaces can simply be installed with a type «B» pipe for gas appliances. There is no restriction as to the brand (manufacturer) of the pipe.

Possible causes and solutions: 

1- The exhaust system may be obstructed. Wind may also have activated the safety mechanism.

Solution: The exterior termination cap on your exhaust system must constantly be free of any element that could block it, such as snow, ice, bird nests, etc. Sometimes, wind may cause a turbulence zone that will cause the burner and the pilot to shut off. If your burner or pilot flame has gone out during a very windy day, there may be nothing wrong with your fireplace. Simply re-light the fireplace.

2- The thermal switch was activated. This applies to B-Vent (open flue) fireplaces only.

Solution: B-Vent gas fireplaces have a thermal switch. This is part of a safety mechanism to prevent the accumulation of combustion gas in the exhaust system. Gas can be temporarily accumulated in the exhaust system as a result of wind blows. If it is the case, you can restart the fireplace without any problem. Combustion gas can also be accumulated in the exhaust system as a result of an improper draft. For B-Vent fireplaces to have a proper draft, they must have a sufficient supply of oxygen. It is highly recommended that your fireplace be located in an area where fresh air can be supplied to the fireplace when needed. A fresh air supply will also compensate for oxygen used up in the room by air moving equipment, such as a bathroom fan, a range hood, or a heat exchanger.

Possible causes and solutions: 

1- The valve’s control knob has not been kept pushed in the pilot position long enough to heat up the thermocouple.

Solution: Make sure that you keep the valve’s control knob pushed in the pilot position for at lease 10 seconds

2- The pilot flame is not adjusted properly.

Solution: The pilot produces three flames (see drawing below). One of them must surround the thermopile. A second flame must cover the thermocouple. A third flame goes toward the front of the burner. If the flames do not surround the thermocouple or the thermopile, have a certified technician make the appropriate adjustments to the flame.

3- Some connections may be missing or defective.

Solution: Verify all connections. If some of them appear to be missing or loose, have a certified technician verify the fireplace.

4- The thermocouple may be defective.

Solution: The thermocouple should produce between 14 and 24 millivolts. A certified technician can easily verify the current (electric charge) produced by the thermocouple and if needed, replace the thermocouple.

Possible causes and solutions: 

1- The control knob on the valve is not in the « ON » position.

Solution: The valve’s control knob has three different settings: ‘OFF’, ‘PILOt’, and ‘On’. When the pilot light is on, you need to turn the valve’s control knob clockwise from the ‘PILOt’ position to the ‘On’ position. The fire will spread over the burner in a few seconds.

2- The gas inlet pressure is too low.

Solution: The lack of sufficient gas pressure may keep the burner from lighting up. A certified technician can measure the inlet gas pressure at adjust it according to the requirements on the certification label located at the back of the fireplace.

3- The blue wire between the ‘TH’ and ‘TP-TH’ ports may be missing, or the connections for the wall thermostat or remote control options may be defective (this applies to ‘millivolt’ valves only). In addition, the wire linking the thermopile to the ‘TP-TH’ and ‘TP’ ports may not be properly connected.

Solution: ‘Millivolt’ valves have connection ports that enable you to install a wall thermostat or a remote control. If those options are not installed, there should be a blue wire (called ‘jumper’) linking the ‘TH’ and ‘TP-TH’ ports. Therefore, if you are not using a wall thermostat or a remote control, make sure that the blue wire is there and that it is properly connected. On the other hand, if you are using a wall thermostat or a remote control with your fireplace, make sure that those options are properly connected to the ‘TH’ and ‘TP-TH’ ports as per the instructions in your owner’s manual. Lastly, the thermopile wire must be properly connected to the ‘TP-TH’ and ‘TP’ ports. Otherwise, the burner will not ignite.

4- The thermopile is defective. The thermopile is the device that generates the current (electric charge), measured in millivolts, necessary for the valve to operate. It is the device that sends the message to the valve that gas can be circulated to the burner when the valve is set at « ON ». Therefore, a defective thermopile will prevent the gas from reaching the burner.

Solution : A certified technician will be able to tell you if the thermopile is too weak or defective. If needed, the technician will be able to replace it To obtain the code for the thermopile that corresponds to your fireplace model, consult our parts section.

5- The gas valve is defective.

Solution: Only a certified technician can verify if the valve is defective or not. To obtain the valve number applicable to your fireplace, consult our parts section.

Possible causes and solutions: 

1- The gas is not reaching the pilot’s head.

Solution #1: First, make sure that the taps on the gas line are fully open. Secondly, if you are using LP (propane), verify that there is fuel in the tank. Finally, make sure that the control knob on the fireplace’s valve is on the ‘pilot’ position.

Solution #2: The pilot orifice may be blocked with combustion residues. As part of your yearly maintenance program, it is recommended to have the pilot orifice cleaned by a certified technician. The pilot orifice may have to be replaced.

2- The ignition system is defective.

Solution: Verify that the igniter inside the fireplace produces a spark when you press the red piezo button. If you do not see any spark, have a certified technician verify the connection between the igniter and the piezo button to make sure it is adequate.

3- The gas inlet pressure is too low.

Solution: Have the inlet pressure verified and adjusted by a certified technician.
The inlet pressure requirement is indicated on the certification label located at the back or under your fireplace.

Possible causes and solutions: 

1- The room temperature is higher than the thermostat setting.

Solution: The wall thermostat will maintain the room’s temperature according to the temperature you have set on the thermostat. It will turn on the appliance when the room is colder than the thermostat’s setting. However, as long as the room’s temperature is higher than the thermostat’s setting, the fireplace will not start. If you want the fireplace to operate, increase the temperature setting on the thermostat.

2- The blue wire (jumper) has not been removed from the « TH » and « TP-TH » ports.

Solution: There is a blue wire that links the ‘TH’ and ‘TP-TH’ ports on your valve. The blue wire needs to be there only if you are not using the wall thermostat or remote control option. The blue wire should be removed upon the installation of the thermostat or remote control option. Consult your owner’s manual.

3- The thermopile is too weak

Solution: The thermopile power is measured in ‘millivolts’. Have a certified technician verify the thermopile’s power. It may have to be replaced. To get the part number of the thermopile, consult our parts section.

4- The diameter of the wire linking the thermostat to the gas valve is too small.

Solution: Consult the chart below. The longer the distance between the valve and the thermostat, the larger the diameter of the wire needs to be.

Possible causes and solutions: 

1- You are not burning the right type of gas.

Solution: Each fireplace is configured to operate with either natural gas or LP (propane). The certification label located at the back or your fireplace shows what type of gas is to be used. It is very important to use the proper type of gas with the fireplace. It is possible, if needed, to convert the fireplace to the desired type of gas. To do that, you need to purchase a conversion kit. To obtain the product code for the conversion kit applicable to your fireplace, please consult our ‘accessories’ section. A certified technician MUST perform the conversion work.

2- The decorative logs are obstructing the flame. The logs then cool off the flame, making the combustion process incomplete.

Solution: It is very important to position the logs properly on the burner. Your owner’s manual gives you a positioning plan for the logs. Follow the instructions carefully. Make sure that the logs are not obstructing the flame. In our most recent log sets; there is a number from 1 to 5 under each log to help you understand the positioning plan in the owner’s manual.

3- There is too much ceramic wool (embers) on the burner’s ports.

Solution: The ceramic wool must be placed as close as possible to the burner’s ports without obstructing them. Below is a drawing showing you how to position the ceramic wool on the burner.

4- The venting system is either leaking, obstructed, or improperly installed.

Solution: All the joints between the pipes that compose the venting system must be sealed. The exterior termination cap must be constantly free of any element that could block it, such as snow, ice, bird nests, etc. Furthermore, the venting system must be installed within the parameters set out in the owner’s manual.

For instance, some models of gas fireplaces require that the pipes respect a minimum height before going through the wall.

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